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Now displaying: Search Results for "haberman"

Welcome to The Foundation for Jewish Studies' Podcast. Please visit our website to learn about upcoming events and donate to support our programs and this podcast. We invite you to join our mailing list and subscribe to our blog. Enjoy the lectures!

 
May 1, 2017

Speaker: Dr. Samual Kassow

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Kehilat Shalom, Gaithersburg, MD

Date: April 2, 2017

The Ringelblum archive in the Warsaw Ghetto buried thousands of documents. But of the 60 people who worked on this national mission, only three survived. Dr. Kassow tells their story.

May 1, 2017

Speaker: Dr. Michael Brenner

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Congregation Olam Tikvah, Fairfax, VA

Date: March 19, 2017

Dr. Brenner tells the story of the rebuilding of Jewish life in Germany after the Holocaust and until today.

 

Apr 4, 2017

Speaker: Dr. Christine Hayes

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Congreation B'nai Tzedek, Potomac, MD

Date: March 5, 2017

Dr. Hayes steps back 2000 years to explore the diverse attitudes towards the divine character of the Torah, and highlights the surprisingly radical approach of the talmudic rabbis.

Apr 4, 2017

Speaker: Dr. Maxine Grossman, University of Maryland, College Park

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Temple Beth Ami, Rockville, MD

Date: December 14, 2016

Dr. Grossman traces the lives, text, and religious commitments in an effort to understand the sectarian movement and the groups role in Jewish history

Apr 4, 2017

Speaker: Dr. James Loeffler, University of Virginia

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Ohr Kodesh Congregation, Chevy Chase, MD

Date: November 14, 2016

Dr. Loeffler makes the argument that the concept of a "genocide law" predates the Holocaust, and is derived from Lemkin's forgotten role as a leader in the interwar Polish Zionist movement.

Jan 23, 2017

Speaker: Dr. David C. Kraemer, Joseph J. and Dora Abbell Librarian and Professor of Talmud and Rabbinics

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Congregation Beth El of Montgomery County, Bethesda

Date: November 3, 2016

Jewish History following the destruction of the Second Temple by Rome has been represented as a history of wandering and homelessness, in which place could not matter because the sacred Jewish place had been left behind.  Besides, as Abraham Joshua Heschel argued, Jews build sanctuaries in time, not in space.  However, building on his new book Rabbinic Judaism: Space and Place, Dr. Kraemer argues that space and place remained central to Judaism even during its exile.  He demonstrates that the "homes" of Judaism were central to Jewish practice throughout the centuries, even before Zionism returned the focus of Judaism to its ancient home.

Jan 23, 2017

Speaker: Dr. Melvin Urofsky, Professor of History and Director of Doctoral Program in Public Policy and Administration, Virginia Comonwealth University

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: B'nai Israel Congregation, Rockville, MD

Date: September 18, 2016

It's now been over 100 years since Louis D. Brandeis was confirmed as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and three-quarters of a century since his death.  Yet his ideas and achievements continue to influence our lives today.  His activities as a lawyer, a reformer, and a Zionist are as relevant today as they were in his lifetime, and his jurisprudence - especially in the areas of free speech and privacy - is still cited in contemporary court decisions.  In his talk, Dr. Urofsky looks briefly at Brandeis's career in law, reform, and Zionism, and devotes the bulk of his lecture to the continuing importance of Justice Brandeis's constitutional ideas.

May 21, 2012

Speaker: Dr. Bernard Dov Cooperman, Louis L. Kaplan Chair and Associate Professor of Jewish History at the University of Maryland

Location: Magen David Sephardic Congregation; Rockville, MD

The Venice ghetto, like the city itself, is now largely the property of tourists. Just as picturesque Venice seems to travelers to float miraculously on islands surrounded by the sea, so too the ghetto seems a Jewish world of elegance and piety, flourishing remarkably behind locked gates in a hostile world. But tourist images can be deceiving. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Venice was a living port, a thriving metropolis, a city devoted above all to trade, commerce, and making money. And like all commercial ports, alongside its wealthy powerbrokers and scholarly humanists, there were inevitably also sailors and thieves, hustlers and con men. The Jews who flocked to the city reflected that same diversity as they competed and interacted with each other and with everyone else amid the bustle on the Rialto. During this lecture we "meet" some of Venice's Jews in those centuries and get a feel for the range of Jewish culture and the possibilities of Jewish life in the crowded streets of the world's most famous ghetto.

May 10, 2012

Speaker: Dr. Deborah Dash Moore, Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor of History at the University of Michigan and Director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

Location: Temple Sinai; Washington, DC

This lecture reveals the importance of gender in interpreting the modern Jewish past. It highlights the profound influence of feminist scholarship by considering the impact of gender on Jewish religious practices and political behavior, educational accomplishments and communal structures, patterns of acculturation, and choice of occupations. The lecture aims to stimulate conversations on Jewish women's creativity and spirituality, as well as explore such difficult issues as violence against women and Jews' reactions to persecution in the Holocaust.

This program is sponsored by Gary and Bernice Lebbin in honor of their family

Apr 26, 2012

Speaker: Dr. Robert Eisen, Professor of Religion and Judaic Studies and Chair of the Department of Religion at George Washington University in Washington, DC

Location: Jewish Community Center of Greater Washington; Rockville, MD

Date: April 26, 2012

In modern times, religious Zionism is often perceived as the most violent branch of Zionism on account of its association with the settler movement on the West Bank and its extremist elements. This lecture examines the veracity of this perception. While religious Zionism can certainly be violent, the reality is more complex. Professor Eisen explores that complexity and analyzes religious Zionism within the context of recent research on the relationship between religion and violence in general.

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