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Now displaying: Page 8

Welcome to The Foundation for Jewish Studies' Podcast. Please visit our website to learn about upcoming events and donate to support our programs and this podcast. We invite you to join our mailing list and subscribe to our blog. Enjoy the lectures!

 
Mar 18, 2010

Speaker: Professor James Kugel, Director of the Institute for the History of the Jewish Bible, Bar Ilan University

Location: Temple Shalom; Chevy Chase, MD

Some of the most familiar holidays in the Jewish calendar look very different in the light of biblical research. What is more, the Dead Sea Scrolls have revealed that, compared with the "Jewish calendar" we use today, Jews in late biblical times used an entirely different calendar—one in which the holidays were never "late this year.” What are Jews today to make of these findings?

Mar 11, 2010

Speaker: Professor David Kraemer, Professor of Talmud and Rabbinics at the Jewish Theological Seminary

Location: B'nai Israel Congregation; Rockville, MD

Jews understand life, death, and everything in between. This lecture explores past Jewish beliefs about what comes after this life, correcting many misconceptions and asking what differences changes in these beliefs might make.

Cosponsored by B'nai Israel Congregation

Feb 15, 2010

Speaker: Eric H. Cline, Chair of the Department of Classical and Semitic Languages and Literatures at The George Washington University

Location: Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center; Reisterstown, MD

Part four discusses how Nebuchadnezzar and the Neo-Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem not once but twice, burned the Temple of Solomon to the ground, and exiled the leading citizens of Jerusalem and Judah to the far-away city of Babylon. It also provides an in-depth look at Jewish history during the Babylonian period.

The Josephine F. and H. Max Ammerman Study Retreat

Feb 15, 2010

Speaker: Eric H. Cline, Chair of the Department of Classical and Semitic Languages and Literatures at The George Washington University

Location: Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center; Reisterstown, MD

Part three discusses how the expansionist ambitions of the Neo-Assyrians from Mesopotamia in the eighth century BCE spelled an end to the kingdom of Israel and gave rise to the tradition of the Ten Lost Tribes. The question of where the exiled members of these tribes ended up continues to be debated.

The Josephine F. and H. Max Ammerman Study Retreat

Feb 14, 2010

Speaker: Eric H. Cline, Chair of the Department of Classical and Semitic Languages and Literatures at The George Washington University

Location: Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center; Reisterstown, MD

Part two discusses David and Solomon. Both kings have been the subject of controversies and debates. A reference to the "House of David" was found in 1993 on an inscription in the north of Israel — the first extra-biblical mention of David yet discovered — allowing us to reconsider the evidence for David and Solomon.

The Josephine F. and H. Max Ammerman Study Retreat

Feb 14, 2010

Speaker: Eric H. Cline, Chair of the Department of Classical and Semitic Languages and Literatures at The George Washington University

Location: Pearlstone Conference and Retreat Center; Reisterstown, MD

Part one discusses the account of the Exodus and the conquest of Canaan.

The Josephine F. and H. Max Ammerman Study Retreat

Jan 21, 2010

Speaker: Professor Naftali Rothenberg, Senior Research Fellow and Jewish Culture and Identity chair at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute; Rabbi of Har Adar, Israel.

Location: Sixth & I Historic Synagogue; Washington, DC

Most people are familiar with two possible approaches to love: the puritanical, which they ascribe to religion, Scripture and “spirituality;” and the permissive, which they generally consider to be materialistic and anti-spiritual. According to the rabbis, love exists within the harmony of spirit and matter, mind and body. The Jewish sources promote just such a relationship between man and woman - on the cognitive-intellectual, spiritual-emotional and physical planes.

Cosponsored by Sixth & I Historic Synagogue

Nov 3, 2009

Speaker: Professor Marsha Rozenblitz, Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Jewish History at the University of Maryland,College Park

Location: Temple Shalom; Chevy Chase, MD

What has life historically been like for Jews in these bastions of Jewish culture? In this lecture, Dr. Rozenblit provides an understanding of Austro-German Jewry by exploring the place of Jews in these regions.

Oct 13, 2009

Speaker: Rabbi Barbara Aiello, Director, Jewish Culture and Hebrew Language Institute (Calabria, Italy) and first woman Rabbi in Italy

Location: Temple Shalom; Silver Spring, MD

Jewish life in Italy has a history that dates back to the time of the Maccabees when Jews settled in Southern Italy 300 years before the Common Era. In this lecture, Rabbi Barbara Aiello shares fascinating stories of Italy’s rich Jewish history; from ancient times through WW II.

Oct 13, 2009

Speaker: Rabbi Barbara Aiello, Director, Jewish Culture and Hebrew Language Institute (Calabria, Italy) and first woman Rabbi in Italy

Location: Temple Shalom; Silver Spring, MD

Jewish life in Italy has a history that dates back to the time of the Maccabees when Jews settled in Southern Italy 300 years before the Common Era. In this lecture, Rabbi Barbara Aiello shares fascinating stories of Italy’s rich Jewish history; from ancient times through WW II.

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