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Now displaying: Category: german jewish heritage

Welcome to The Foundation for Jewish Studies' Podcast. Please visit our website to learn about upcoming events and donate to support our programs and this podcast. We invite you to join our mailing list and subscribe to our blog. Enjoy the lectures!

 
May 1, 2017

Speaker: Dr. Michael Brenner

Program Series: Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

Location: Congregation Olam Tikvah, Fairfax, VA

Date: March 19, 2017

Dr. Brenner tells the story of the rebuilding of Jewish life in Germany after the Holocaust and until today.

 

Mar 29, 2012

Speaker: Dr. Michael A. Meyer, Adolph S. Ochs Professor of Jewish History Emeritus at Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati and international president of the Leo Baeck Institute, a scholarly organization devoted to the historical study of German Jewry

Location: Temple Shalom; Chevy Chase, MD

How did the Jews of Germany respond to the rise of Hitler, which put an end to their dreams of political equality in a liberal state and cultural integration into a civilized society? This lecture deals with the radically changed circumstances and the remarkable moral resistance that rabbis and laity displayed in the face of ever increasing oppression.

Supported by Gary and Bernice Lebbin as part of a series on German-Jewish Cultural Heritage

Oct 17, 2011

Speaker: Dr. Michael Berenbaum, writer, lecturer, and teacher consulting in the conceptual development of museums and the development of historical films

Location: Ohr Kodesh Congregation; Chevy Chase, MD

Dr. Berenbaum speaks about the lives of Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, and Gershom Scholem. Their different but intersecting journeys back toward Judaism had an incredible impact on Jewish life and secured places for Buber, Rosenzweig, and Scholem as three of the most influential Jews of the 20th century.

This program is the annual Abraham S. Kay lecture, made possible by the generosity of Jack Kay.

Also co-sponsored by the Georgetown University Program for Jewish Civilization

Feb 8, 2011

Speaker: Dr. Michael Brenner, Chair of Jewish History and Culture at the University of Munich in Germany

Location: JCC of Greater Washington; Rockville, MD

Contrary to common belief, Jewish life in Germany before the rise of the Nazis was culturally thriving. While one segment of the Jewish community was assimilated, there was a tendency, especially among the younger generation, to show renewed interest in Jewish matters. German Jewry in the 1920s was perhaps the first Jewish community that lived in a relatively open and democratic society and began at the same time to look for modern expressions of its Jewish identity. In many respects it serves as an example for modern American Jews, even though the circumstances of its existence were quite different. Dr. Brenner discussed everyday life among German Jews, their religious expressions, and some of their important intellectuals, like Franz Rosenzweig, Gershom Scholem, and Leo Baeck.

This program was made possible by the generosity of Gary and Bernice Lebbin as part of a series of programs on German-Jewish Cultural Heritage.

Nov 3, 2009

Speaker: Professor Marsha Rozenblitz, Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Jewish History at the University of Maryland,College Park

Location: Temple Shalom; Chevy Chase, MD

What has life historically been like for Jews in these bastions of Jewish culture? In this lecture, Dr. Rozenblit provides an understanding of Austro-German Jewry by exploring the place of Jews in these regions.

Sep 15, 2009

Speaker: Professor Walter Laqueur in conversation with Rabbi Joshua Haberman

Location: Temple Shalom; Silver Spring, MD

In this lecture, Professor Laqueur and Rabbi Haberman discuss the New Germany and its Jews, the rise of anti-Semitism, and Israel and the Jewish Future.

Mar 24, 2009

Speaker: Dr. Steven Lowenstein, Isadore Levine Professor of Jewish History, American University

Location: B'nai Israel Congregation; Rockville, MD

"Tumultuous" is an understatement in describing the historic relationship between Jews and the rest of the German state. Jews have been in Germany since the early fourth century, and German-Jewish relations have fluctuated between tolerance and violence. This lecture treats the topic of assimilation and strives to enrich our understanding of how woven into (or excluded from) the fabric of the nation Jews in Germany were before the Holocaust.

Endowed by of K. Peter & Yvonne Wagner as a part of a series of programs on German-Jewish Cultural Heritage

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