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Now displaying: May, 2012

Welcome to The Foundation for Jewish Studies' Podcast. Please visit our website to learn about upcoming events and donate to support our programs and this podcast. We invite you to join our mailing list and subscribe to our blog. Enjoy the lectures!

 
May 21, 2012

Speaker: Dr. Bernard Dov Cooperman, Louis L. Kaplan Chair and Associate Professor of Jewish History at the University of Maryland

Location: Magen David Sephardic Congregation; Rockville, MD

The Venice ghetto, like the city itself, is now largely the property of tourists. Just as picturesque Venice seems to travelers to float miraculously on islands surrounded by the sea, so too the ghetto seems a Jewish world of elegance and piety, flourishing remarkably behind locked gates in a hostile world. But tourist images can be deceiving. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Venice was a living port, a thriving metropolis, a city devoted above all to trade, commerce, and making money. And like all commercial ports, alongside its wealthy powerbrokers and scholarly humanists, there were inevitably also sailors and thieves, hustlers and con men. The Jews who flocked to the city reflected that same diversity as they competed and interacted with each other and with everyone else amid the bustle on the Rialto. During this lecture we "meet" some of Venice's Jews in those centuries and get a feel for the range of Jewish culture and the possibilities of Jewish life in the crowded streets of the world's most famous ghetto.

May 10, 2012

Speaker: Dr. Deborah Dash Moore, Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor of History at the University of Michigan and Director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies

Location: Temple Sinai; Washington, DC

This lecture reveals the importance of gender in interpreting the modern Jewish past. It highlights the profound influence of feminist scholarship by considering the impact of gender on Jewish religious practices and political behavior, educational accomplishments and communal structures, patterns of acculturation, and choice of occupations. The lecture aims to stimulate conversations on Jewish women's creativity and spirituality, as well as explore such difficult issues as violence against women and Jews' reactions to persecution in the Holocaust.

This program is sponsored by Gary and Bernice Lebbin in honor of their family

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